Category: Catholic Church

A Key Ingredient for a Phenomenal Advent

Advent begins tomorrow. Are you ready? “I can see that we as a society are hungry for community and shared experiences,” the author writes. And what do you know? Catholics have hundreds of possibilities throughout the year for just such celebrations. But we are confused. After having looked so long

How We Can Grieve Together While Grieving Differently: A Review of Grieving Together by Laura Kelly Fanucci and Franco David Fanucci

Previously published in the Hughson Chronicle-Denair Dispatch   Grief. The five stages of grief are shock, bargaining, anger, depression and acceptance. The four tasks of grief are accepting the reality of your loss, processing your grief and pain, adjust to the world without your loved one in it, and finding

Meet Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha

In honor of Native American Heritage Month and a reminder of the power of Christian unity, please allow me to introduce you to Kateri.     Written and presented to the Young Ladies Institute, Antoinette #193, a Catholic Women’s Organization   Called the “Lily of the Mohawks”, and the “Genevieve

Meet Joan of Arc…and Mark Twain

By the time Mark Twain died, he was anti-Catholic and anti-French, yet he still referred to “The Recollections of Joan of Arc” as his best and favorite work. It was the work he claimed to have researched the most, using the transcripts from the trial of Joan of Arc and

Meet Hildegard of Bingen

A brief introduction to the person and personality of one of the greatest ladies of the Catholic Church.     We can know God. Born in 1098, Hildegard of Bingen, a sickly child born of nobility was given at the age of eight to Jutta of Sponheim for care in

Meet Edith Stein

A brief introduction to the person and personality of one of the greatest ladies of the Catholic Church.     During her beatification, John Paul II described Edith Stein as  “A personality who united within her rich life a dramatic synthesis of our century. It was a synthesis of a

Can we still find refuge in the Catholic Church?

  The image is a pelican, a mother whose children will starve, so with her beak, she opens her breast and allows them to drink from her blood, that they may survive.     In the selflessness of a mother, Christ’s heart is pierced on the cross and, pouring his

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